The Netherlands: wide political consensus against sugar tax

The Netherlands: wide political consensus against sugar tax

A broad consensus against the introduction of a sugar tax in the Netherlands has emerged from parties across the political spectrum.

Asked about their position on the issue following the debate in the UK, some Dutch politicians expressed opposition to changing citizens’ behavior through taxation: “People should decide for themselves what they eat and drink“, said Erik Ziengs, from the People’s Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD). A view shared also by Reinette Klever, Member of the Dutch House of Representatives for the Party for Freedom (PVV), according to whom a sugar tax would be “patronizing“. Others, like Hanke Bruins Slot of the CDA (Christian Democratic Appeal), stressed that Sugar is a natural product”.

The Socialist Party, which is working towards less sugar and salt in products, has ruled out taxation as an effective measure, preferring instead to push manufacturers to use less sugar and salt.

More strikingly, even parties in favour of a sugar tax like the Labour Party (PvdA) do not have a clear proposal on how to make it technically feasible. “It would mean a lot of hassle”, admitted Ed Groot, Member of the Dutch House of Representatives for the PvdA.

The full article (in Dutch) can be found at: http://www.telegraaf.nl/binnenland/24811269/__Suikertaks_niet_in_zicht__.html

UK government responds to Jamie Oliver’s petition saying that it has “no plans to introduce a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages”

UK government responds to Jamie Oliver’s petition saying that it has “no plans to introduce a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages”

On Monday 21 September 2015, the UK government has responded to the petition launched by the well-known chef Jamie Oliver, who is campaigning for the introduction of a ‘soda tax’ as a solution for the problem of obesity. In its response, the government states that is not willing to introduce taxes that will increase “the cost of living” and negatively affect “UK productivity and economic growth”. The response also stresses that “the causes of obesity are complex” and “will require a broad and comprehensive approach” and therefore the administration is developing a strategy on childhood obesity that will take into account all of these factors.

The full statement by the UK Government can be found here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/106651.

 

 

 

Australian Beverages Council replies to calls for ‘soda tax’ providing evidence on its ineffectiveness and unfairness

Australian Beverages Council replies to calls for ‘soda tax’ providing evidence on its ineffectiveness and unfairness

Like many other countries, Australia is looking for the best solution to tackle the growing problem of obesity. As many are asking for a tax on certain products, including soft drinks, the Australian Beverages Council shows why a measure of this type will not work.

First of all, recent studies have identified what has been called “Australian Paradox” – the fact that in the last years, while the refined sugar intake has dramatically decreased (26%), as well as the consumption of sweetened beverages, the prevalence of obesity in Australians was multiplied by 3. Moreover, according to a 2012 Australian Health Survey conducted by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), soft drinks represent just 1.7% of the average adult’s daily calorie intake. This figure shows that a tax on soft drinks would not have much effects.

In addition, similar taxes in other countries have failed: the Danish ‘fat tax’ was abolished 18 months after its introduction due to its ineffectiveness and negative impact on the economy. In 2014 also the European Commission conducted a study on the impact of food taxes, concluding that instead of increasing citizens’ health these measures provoked job losses, higher food prices and higher administrative costs.

The introduction of a soft drinks tax in Mexico has raised another fundamental concern: the 63,7% of it is collected from low income families, according to KantarWorldpanel. This illustrates how such taxes are regressive and damage the most the least well-off families.

Two more facts have to be taken into account: consumers are choosing more and more no or low calorie products and, according to a 2014 Australian survey, they strongly believe that education is the most effective way to tackle obesity.

The full statement by the Australian Beverages Council can be found here: ABC White Paper.